Dissidentia

From GATE
Revision as of 12:47, 11 November 2019 by ArchivesPUG (talk | contribs)
(diff) ← Older revision | Latest revision (diff) | Newer revision → (diff)

Forcellini, E., Lexicon totius latinitatis
What is the importance of heresy[1] and dissent for the sociocultural evolution of Christian semantics? Put in social systems language it could be said that in the course of Christian communications evolution, heresies or non-conformist Christian communications represent variations which allow the recognition of a particular communicative selection, which in time will be expressed as an expectation structure (stabilization) or simply as ecclesiastical orthodoxy[2].

For a Christian Church history the main variation element turns out to be unorthodox theological standpoints or assertions opposed to ecclesiastical sanctioned dogmas[3]. Non-conformist Christian communications function was that of defining a particular and alternative Christian semantics, and allowing for various ecclesiastical patriarchates to consolidate. Here, the guiding distinctions are orthodoxy/ heresy (canonical/ apochriphal when referred to the testamentary tradition, and hegemonic Church/ schismatic Church when viewed from an organizational perspective).


Guiding Distinctions for a Sociological Framework

When Church history is viewed through these guiding distinctions, the protruding theoretical statement is that dogma formation is linked to ecclesiastical organization (consolidation of patriarchates together with its territorial jurisdiction) as well as to their rivalry (in general the question about the primacy of patriarchates). The more creepy and daring the beliefs asserted dogmatically, the greater the need to make religious generalizations, that is, to affirm one’s own theological opinion against the opinions held by other organized churches, in order to establish them as criterion of membership:

These reflections lead to the sociological hypothesis of a connection between the forms and degree of organization of the religion system and the magnitude of the dogmatization of religion, whereby dogmatics can be used in organizations for purposes of distinction, either for recognition of right faith and for the expulsion of heresies, or, finally, in the form of pre-formulated articles and confessions of faith in order to fix the conditions of association in religious organizations (Luhmann 2007b, 207).

Broadly and as examples of this, the first Church schism of the eastern non-Chalcedonian churches (451) —Coptic, Armenian, Syrian and Ethiopian—corresponds to the rivalry between Alexandria and Antioch (and in general all eastern episcopates). The second schism of the Greek Orthodox Church (869/879) corresponds to the rivalry between Byzantium and Rome. Finally, the last schism of the Western Latin Church in 1517 (Protestant Churches), where local Christian traditions (Wycliffe, Hus, Luther, Calvin, Zwingli, Grebel) demanded their independence from Rome. This is why

… the historical evolution [of the Church] seems to be characterized by the progressive diminishing of the councils’ ecumenicity –from universal to Western, from Western to Roman– as well as of their horizon. The priority put in service to the community’s living faith has been gradually changed in favor of a functionality that serves the ecclesiastical institution (Alberigo 1993, 13-14).

Since Constantine the Great, Roman imperial policies and the Christian Church intermixed to the point that the most important councils or synods of the Church began to be convened by the Roman Emperor and, the way round, Church councils' decisions were incorporated into the Roman legislation:

It was clearly within the emperor’s powers to revise the laws and several such revisions were made. But he could also add Novels (Novellae), new laws or constitutions. The Byzantines, living as they did in a theocratic society, found it hard to be sure where things temporal ended and things spiritual began. Thus the laws of their state frequently incorporated legal rulings of the church. Where a necessary qualification for citizenship was Orthodoxy in religious belief, it was natural that the canons of the church councils which had defined that belief should also be the law of the land. Justinian had decreed that “the canons of the first four councils of the church, at Nicaea, Constantinople, Ephesus and Chalcedon, should have the status of law. For we accept as holy writ the dogmas of those councils and guard their canons as laws” (Nicol 1997, 65).

This opens the way to a Christendom which closely combines Church and State.

An Alternative Historical Narrative for Church History

By the ninth century, the division between Western (Roman patriarchate) and Eastern (Constantinopolitan patriarchate) Christianity became evident. At this time a conflict of jurisdiction over southern Italy and Dalmatia escalated into the filioque controversy, a dogmatic point pertaining to the use of the clause “and the Son” in the creed formula, which led to conflicting relations between both patriarchates.

The Council of Constantinople IV has the peculiarity of having taken place in a twofold version (869 and 879). The Roman version of 869 condemned Photios I, Byzantine patriarch, for eliminating the filioque clause from the creed, and decided on the order of precedence of the patriarchates: Rome, Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch and Jerusalem (Jedin 1960, 47ff). The Byzantine version of 879 reinstated Pothios as legitimate patriarch and rejected the decisions taken by Romans ten years before.

The Catholic Church recognizes the ecumenical character of this council; the Greeks do not. The schism did not consummate thanks to the Saracen incursions in Italy and to the weekness of the Carolingian empire, but progressively became final in the eleventh century with the re-edition of the filioque controversy and later on with the sack of Constantinople by westerners of the fourth crusade in 1204 (Mitre 2000, 35ff). Never again a general council took place in the East:

One can not ignore the most important characteristic of the Constantinopolitan [IV], looked from the series of councils that preceded it: it is the first council considered as ecumenical only by the Western Church and converted in fact as a symbol of division. Although it was not directly connected with the separation of East and West, it was nevertheless a prelude to it because it depicts characteristic symptoms and motives (Perrone 1993, 137).

The breaking points for an alternative periodization of Church history are set in accordance with the guiding distinctions established before. The first period is that of Christian Antiquity (first to fifth centuries AD). On the level of organized Christianity, it points to the hegemony and later displacement of Alexandria as the patriarchate with primacy in the East, and culminates after lengthy dogmatic disputes against Gnostics, Arians, Nestorians and Monophysites[4] with the schism of the eastern Christian churches during the Council of Chalcedon in 451.

The second period goes from the sixth to the ninth centuries, until the Council of Constantinople IV (869-879). During this time the disqualification of Monophysitism is confirmed as well as all forms of compromise with eastern non-Chalcedonian churches. Properly speaking, it is the period in which Constantinople consolidates as the “new Rome”, and the immediate one following the massive invasions of “barbarian” peoples to Western Europe and North Africa.

Finally, the third and last period when the Investiture Controversy takes place, from the tenth to the sixteenth centuries. This period follows the schism of Photios I, and ends with the schism of the Latin Church, which would give rise to the evangelical Protestant churches.

Quite contrary to an interpretation for the period which emphasizes the cesaropapist tendencies of secular rulers (since Constantine a feature which followed custom and accepted usage), what is really happening is an overwhelming centralization of power in the hands of the Roman patriarch. In this period Roman patriarchs reach their highest powers and also their major flaws: the launching of Crusades, the appropriation of indulgences, the creation of the Pontifical Inquisition, and the excessive protocol and opulence in Eucharist celebration.

Apart from papal councils themselves, the concentration of power on the Roman patriarch may be found in three distinctive elements: the Roman Curia (“no secular administration could come anywhere near it”), the figure of the papal legate, and the emergence of powerful religious orders (Mitterauer 2010, 150-151). The translocal power acquired thus will transform the Roman patriarchate into a proto-colonial power allied to western European powers-to-be:

At the end of the eleventh century, however, the papacy, which for at least two decades had been urging secular rulers to liberate Byzantium from the infidels, finally succeeded in organizing the First Crusade (1096-1099). A second crusade was launched in 1147 and a third crusade in 1189. These first crusades were the foreign wars of the Papal Revolution [Gregorian Reformation]. They not only increased the power and authority of the papacy but also opened a new axis eastward to the outside world and turned the Mediterranean Sea from a natural defensive barrier against invasion from without into a route for western Europe’s own military and commercial expansion (Berman 1983, 100-101).

Martin Luther and Modern Religious Differentiation

Calvin, Leo X and Luther: Allegory of The True Faith Reformation (Allegorie auf dem rechten Glauben, 1650-1700) Swiss National Museum.
Social systems theory refers to religions strictly as communication. In a flat formulation, when the theory refers to religion, the topic is “exclusively religious communication, religious meaning that is updated in communication as the meaning of communication”.[5]But this already involves a specific religious meaning different from other meanings in society:

Originally, religion was secured by society itself. Not in the sense that every action was always religiously qualified. Neither social communication nor the surrounding nature were totally and completely sacralized. But in its foundations, religion and society were not distinguishable from one another… The historical-evolutionary event which we want to analyze under the tag “differentiation process of religion”, ends with this possibility. The process of differentiation involves a renunciation to redundancy. Religion does not assure today either against inflation or against an unwanted change of government, or against the outcome of a passion, or against the scientific refutation of one’s own theories. It can not interfere with other functional systems (Luhmann 2009, 195).[6]

Theoretical Background: Differentiation Theory

The theory of differentiation in sociology has a very long history. It is present not only in Niklas Luhmann, but also in important classical and contemporary sociologists such as Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Georg Simmel, Max Weber, and Talcott Parsons: “Since its establishment, sociology has been concerned with differentiation” (Luhmann 2007a, 471ff).[7] The concept is used to produce the unity of differences or, if you will, to indicate the unity through plurality or diversity.

Differentiation makes possible to refer to social reality in a more abstract way. Since the nineteenth century unities and differences began to be understood as a result of processes, that is, as evolutionary developments. In sociology, the concept of differentiation allowed to change the theories of progress with structural analyses. To a large extent, social anthropology itself would share this evolutionary and structural idea of human societies.

How have so different authors expressed differentiation through their theories? In Marx, social differentiation is conceived as a theory of social formations, each with different modes of production. Differentiation in Durkheim is understood as division of social labor, characteristic of societies with organic solidarity, opposed to simple societies whose solidarity is mechanical.[8] The idea of the division of labor was imported into sociology from economic science, along with its positive assessment.

Differentiation in Simmel is expressed as a theory of forms of association distinguishable from each other temporally and spatially. In Weber, differentiation is represented as institutional diversity or as a multiplicity of life orders (religion, economics, politics, erotica). These orders of life will tend to adjust to a rationality according to ends.

Talcott Parsons’ theory of the general system of action (AGIL schema of four functions with their different constituent ends and media) explains societal development as a growing differentiation based on role differences and this, in turn, provides the explanation of modern individualism.

What is important is to emphasize that the concept of differentiation has a very broad background in sociology, antecedents all that are taken up and reconfigured by social systems theory. Luhmann will end up proposing three societal types that, important enough to say, coexist in contemporary world society and constitute a typology of social differentiation which admits various degrees of complexity (the positive assessment of greater complexity per se is now removed).

The three primordial societal types, from lesser to greater complexity, are: a) segmentary societies (tribal in type), composed by equal segments; b) stratified societies (aristocratic, class or caste in type), composed by unequal segments; c) functionally differentiated society (modern society), composed by different social systems (religion, economics, politics, law, science). This view of modern society is regarded as external societal differentiation, while internal differentiation expresses itself through various confessions of faith (in the religious system), political parties (in the political system), or theories and research methods (in the scientific system).

Modern Religious Differentiation

It is important to note that the differentiated social systems of which the theory speaks about refer only and exclusively to communication, so that when one speaks of the system of religion, politics or sports, the theory refers only to religious, political or sports communication. We are faced with a sociological theory of communication which understands in principle that society is composed by communication only.

Once the basic background of the theory of social differentiation has been reviewed, the most important thesis of social systems theory related to the system of religion can be put forward: sixteenth-century Protestant reformations are but the expression of the internal differentiation of religion, which is concomitant with the emergence of a new societal type: the functionally differentiated society. Thus, Protestantisms have to do with the evolutionary momentum in which European societies moved from a form of stratified differentiation to a modern one:

The late middle ages and the Reformation added a critique of merit and a radical shift towards grace to the general Christian emphasis on the factors of salvation… Based on some very controversial ideas, Weber assumes that this shift created motives for rational economic and even rational scientific action. However, what is more important is that the process dismantled interferences of religion in the economy and science which had taken the form of relatively concrete evaluations of action relevant to salvation… The evolutionary success probably lay more in the strong disentanglement and differentiation of systems than in the special effectiveness of an ascetic motivation for salvation (Luhmann 1984, 79-80).

If there is a legacy of sixteenth century Protestant reformations for the modern world, it is that they paved the way to the specialization and fragmentation of religious communications.[9]Along with the Lutheran Church, Western Christianity was —and continues being— crushed into several churches: Calvinist, Zwinglian, Anabaptist, Anglican, Methodist, Presbyterian, and so on. To this extent Protestantism prompted other types of communications to do the same: to specialize and fragment themselves (to diversify). For example, from the Diet of Speyer in 1526 comes the principle cuius regio, eius religio (according to the religion of the king, so will be that of the kingdom), with which each Protestant prince claimed for himself the right to adopt religion and organize a church of his own in accordance with the dictates of his conscience, and —clearly enough— in accordance with the religious reformations in course. In this way, religious differentiation reinforced political differentiation in princely states by feeding incipient notions of sovereign power.[10]

Societal religious differentiation ran in parallel to the differentiation of other spheres of life and ended up in the eighteenth century with the constitution of a new type of society: the functional differentiated or contemporary modern world society. This society will be characterized by communicational differentiation (politics, economics, law, religion, science, art, health, sport). Or explained in another way: to move and be able to function in modern society one must distinguish communicative and situational spheres or orders of life. A person speaks and communicates depending on whether (s)he is at home, at the university, at the office, at the bank or at the church of his/her choice. Failure to do so runs the risk of being considered “bizarre”.

In favor of this interpretation of sixteenth century Protestantisms —as religious differentiation— speaks the happy confluence of an independent study close to conceptual history: before the sixteenth century the concept of religion was indistinguishable from many other communications. It is not until the arrival of Protestantisms that religion adopts the modern (differentiated) meaning of communications related exclusively to the transcendental.[11]

References

  1. Catholic canon law defines heresy as “the persistent denial, after receiving baptism, of a truth to be believed with divine and catholic faith, or the pertinacious doubt about it; apostasy is the total rejection of the Christian faith. Schism is the rejection to subject oneself to the Supreme Pontiff or to have communion with the members of the church submitted to him... [Nevertheless,] From a current perspective, the commentators of the Pauline texts, both Catholic and Protestant, have chosen to interpret the Greek expression hairesis (Latin haeresia) in the sense of splits, parties, factions, and not as doctrinal discrepancies that would receive later. St. Paul [1 Cor, 11:19], they say, would be thinking in the contrasts of practical, moral and personal characteristics of the Corinthian community” (Mitre 2003, 175, 33).
  2. For the sociocultural evolution mechanisms compare Luhmann (2007a, 325-469), third chapter on evolution. The book, considered his major work, was published one year before Luhmann’s death (Luhmann 1997). The Spanish version was published ten years later (Luhmann 2007a), and an early draft was first available in Italian (Luhmann & De Giorgi 1992) and a year later in Spanish (Luhmann & De Giorgi 1993). The English version was published by Stanford University Press in two volumes (Luhmann 2012, 2013a).
  3. For the detailed argumentation compare Ornelas (2018, 87-170), second chapter on heresies and Christian organization.
  4. Against Church orthodoxy, Gnostics postulated a dualist philosophy which opposes two principles (good/ bad; light/ darkness; spirit/ matter), and includes the belief in an ignorant god (demiurge) who created the material evil world (Markschies 2002, 37-38). Arians denied the divinity of Christ. Nestorians rejected Mary as mother of God. Monophysites argued, without denying the double nature of Christ, that the human nature of Jesus was absorbed in favor of his divinity.
  5. Compare Luhmann (2007b, 37). This book was posthumously published (Luhmann 2000). The English version was published by Stanford University Press (Luhmann 2013b).
  6. This book is a compilation of the two most important articles that Luhmann wrote in life about the system of religion (Luhmann 1977, 77-181; Luhmann 1989, 259-357). An English version of Religious Dogmatics could be found in Luhmann (1984).
  7. Opening phrase of chapter four on differentiation.
  8. For a revision of major sociological theorists compare Ritzer & Stepnisky (2011).
  9. For the detailed argumentation compare Ornelas (2018, 171-240), third chapter on Lutheran communications and counter-reformation.
  10. Historians now accept the Investiture Controversy of the late eleventh and early twelfth centuries as the clearest antecedent of modern State inception, and consequently as a pre-condition to Church-State differentiation. For this compare Strayer (1970, 3-56), Berman (1983, 85-119) and Mitterauer (2010, 144-193).
  11. For the full argumentation compare Nongbri (2013).

Bibliography

Alberigo, Giuseppe. 1993. Prólogo: Los concilios ecuménicos en la historia. In Historia de los concilios ecuménicos, Giuseppe Alberigo (ed.). Salamanca: Sígueme.

Berman, Harold. 1983. Law and Revolution. The Formation of the Legal Western Tradition. Cambridge/ London: Harvard University Press.

Jedin, Hubert. 1960. Breve historia de los concilios. Barcelona: Herder.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2013a. Theory of Society, Volume II. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2013b. A Systems Theory of Religion. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2012. Theory of Society, Volume I. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2009. Sociología de la religión. México: Herder/ Universidad Iberoamericana (UIA).

Luhmann, Niklas. 2007a. La sociedad de la sociedad. México: Herder/ UIA.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2007b. La religión de la sociedad. Madrid: Trotta.

Luhmann, Niklas 2000. Die Religion der Gesellschaft. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1997. Die Gesellschaft der Gesellschaft. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1989. Die Ausdifferenzierung der Religion. In Gesellschaftsstruktur und Semantik. Studien zur Wissenssoziologie der modernen Gesellschaft, Vol. 3. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1984. Religious Dogmatics and the Evolution of Societies. New York/ Toronto: Edwin Mellen Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1977. Religiöse Dogmatik und Gesellschaftliche Evolution. In Funktion der Religion. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas & Raffaele De Giorgi. 1993. Teoría de la sociedad. México: UIA/ Universidad de Guadalajara.

Luhmann, Niklas & Raffaele De Giorgi. 1992. Teoria della società. Milano: Franco Angeli.

Markschies, Christoph. 2002. La gnosis. Barcelona: Herder.

Mitre F., Emilio. 2003. Ortodoxia y herejía: entre la Antigüedad y el Medievo. Madrid: Cátedra.

Mitre F., Emilio. 2000. Las herejías medievales de Oriente y Occidente. Madrid: Arco Libros.

Mitterauer, Michael. 2010. Why Europe? The Medieval Origins of Its Special Path. Chicago/ London: University of Chicago Press.

Nicol, D. M. 1997. Byzantine Political Thought. In The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought, c. 350-c.1450, James H. Burns (ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Nongbri, Brent. 2013. Before Religion. A History of a Modern Concept. New Haven/ London: Yale University Press.

Ornelas, Marco. 2018. Modern Religious Differentiation: The Latin Mass (1517-1570). Mexico: Independently Published.

Perrone, Lorenzo. 1993. El cuarto concilio de Constantinopla (869-870). In Historia de los concilios ecuménicos, Giuseppe Alberigo (ed.). Salamanca: Sígueme.

Ritzer, George & Jeffrey Stepnisky (eds.). 2011. The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Major Social Theorists, Vols. I and II. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Strayer, Joseph R. 1970. On the Medieval Origins of the Modern State. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.


Article by Marco Ornelas.
Book designed by Benny Forsberg from the Noun Project - with lines.png

The text of this page has been reviewed and approved by the Lexicon of modernity (ISBN: 9788878393950 ; DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.1483194) editorial board.
Cite this page - Download PDF

Forcellini, E., Lexicon totius latinitatis

¿Cuál es la importancia de la herejía[1] y la disidencia para la evolución sociocultural de una semántica cristiana? Puesto en el lenguaje de los sistemas sociales, se podría decir que en el curso de la evolución de las comunicaciones cristianas, las herejías o las comunicaciones cristianas no conformistas representan variaciones que permiten el reconocimiento de una selección comunicativa particular, que al paso del tiempo se expresará como una estructura de expectativa (estabilización) o simplemente como ortodoxia eclesiástica.[2]

Para una historia de la iglesia cristiana, el principal elemento de variación resultan ser posiciones teológicas heterodoxas o afirmaciones opuestas a los dogmas sancionados por la iglesia.[3] La función de la comunicación cristiana no conformista fue definir una semántica cristiana particular y alternativa y permitir la consolidación de varios patriarcados de la iglesia. Aquí, las distinciones orientadoras son ortodoxia/ herejía (canónico/ apócrifo cuando se refiere a la tradición testamentaria, e iglesia hegemónica/ iglesia cismática cuando se le ve desde una perspectiva organizacional).

Distinciones orientadoras para un encuadre sociológico

Cuando la historia de la iglesia es vista a través de estas distinciones orientadoras, la afirmación teórica sobresaliente es que la formación de dogmas está vinculada a la organización eclesiástica (consolidación de los patriarcados junto con su jurisdicción territorial), así como a su rivalidad (en general, la cuestión sobre la primacía de los patriarcados). Cuanto más espeluznantes y audaces sean las creencias afirmadas dogmáticamente, mayor será la necesidad de hacer generalizaciones religiosas, es decir, de afirmar la propia opinión teológica en contra de las opiniones sostenidas por otras iglesias organizadas, a fin de establecerlas como criterio de membresía:

Estas reflexiones conducen a la hipótesis sociológica de una conexión entre las formas y el grado de organización del sistema religión y la magnitud de la dogmatización de la religión, con lo cual la dogmática puede utilizarse en las organizaciones para objetivos de distinción, sea para el reconocimiento de la recta fe y para la expulsión de herejías, sea, finalmente, en la forma de artículos y confesiones de fe preformuladas a fin de fijar las condiciones de asociación en las organizaciones religiosas (Luhmann 2007b, 207).

A grandes rasgos y como ejemplos de esto, el primer cisma eclesiástico de las iglesias orientales no calcedónicas (451) —copta, armenia, siria y etíope— corresponde a la rivalidad entre Alejandría y Antioquía (y en general todos los episcopados orientales). El segundo cisma de la iglesia Ortodoxa Griega (869/879) corresponde a la rivalidad entre Bizancio y Roma. Finalmente, el último cisma de la iglesia latina occidental en 1517 (iglesias protestantes), donde tradiciones cristianas locales (Wyclif, Hus, Lutero, Calvino, Zwinglio, Grebel) exigieron su independencia de Roma. Esta es la razón por la cual

…la evolución histórica [de la iglesia] parece estar caracterizada por una reducción progresiva de la ecumenicidad de los concilios —de universales a occidentales, de occidentales a romanos— y también de su horizonte. La hegemonía del servicio a la fe vivida de la comunidad parece que ha sido paulatinamente sustituida por la funcionalidad al servicio de la institución eclesial (Alberigo 1993, 13-14).

Desde Constantino el Grande, las políticas imperiales romanas y la iglesia cristiana se entremezclaron hasta el punto en que los concilios o sínodos más importantes de la iglesia comenzaron a ser convocados por el emperador romano y, a la inversa, las decisiones de los concilios de la iglesia fueron incorporadas a la legislación romana:

Era claramente responsabilidad del emperador revisar las leyes y muchas revisiones fueron hechas. Pero también el emperador podía incorporar Novedades (Novellae), nuevas leyes o constituciones. Los bizantinos, siendo que vivían en una sociedad teocrática, encontraban difícil poder distinguir con claridad dónde terminaban las cosas temporales y dónde iniciaban las espirituales. Es así que las leyes del Estado incorporaban con frecuencia normas legales de la iglesia. Ahí donde se establecía una necesaria creencia religiosa ortodoxa para la ciudadanía, era natural recurrir a los cánones de los concilios de la iglesia que la habían definido y considerarlos ley vigente. Justiniano había decretado que “los cánones de los primeros cuatro concilios de la iglesia en Nicea, Constantinopla, Éfeso y Calcedonia, debían tener el estatus de ley. Esto es así porque aceptamos como mandato sagrado los dogmas de aquellos concilios y consideramos sus cánones como ley” (Nicol 1997, 65).

Esto abre el camino a una cristiandad que combina estrechamente iglesia y Estado.

Una narrativa histórica alternativa para la historia de la iglesia

En el siglo ix, la división entre el cristianismo occidental (patriarcado romano) y el oriental (patriarcado constantinopolitano) se hizo evidente. En ese momento, un conflicto de jurisdicción sobre el sur de Italia y Dalmacia escaló en la controversia sobre el filioque, un punto dogmático relacionado con el uso de la cláusula “y del Hijo” en la fórmula del credo, que llevó a relaciones conflictivas entre ambos patriarcados.

El IV Concilio de Constantinopla tiene la peculiaridad de haberse celebrado en versión doble (869 y 879). La versión romana de 869 condenó a Focio I, patriarca bizantino, por eliminar la cláusula del filioque del credo, y decidió el orden de precedencia de los patriarcados: Roma, Constantinopla, Alejandría, Antioquía y Jerusalén (Jedin 1960, 47ss). La versión bizantina de 879 reestableció a Focio como patriarca legítimo y rechazó las decisiones tomadas por los romanos diez años antes.

La iglesia Católica reconoce el carácter ecuménico de este concilio; los griegos no. El cisma no se consuma gracias a las incursiones sarracenas en Italia y a la debilidad del imperio carolingio, y se convirtió progresivamente en definitivo en el siglo xi con la reedición de la controversia sobre el filioque y más tarde con el saqueo de Constantinopla por los occidentales de la cuarta Cruzada en 1204 (Mitre 2000, 35ss). Nunca más se celebró un concilio general en oriente:

No se puede ignorar la peculiaridad más importante del [IV concilio] constantinopolitano, respecto a la serie de los concilios que le habían precedido: es el primero que fue recibido como ecuménico únicamente por la iglesia occidental, convertido de hecho en un símbolo de división; aunque no estuviera directamente en el origen de ella, fue sin embargo el preludio de la separación entre oriente y occidente, puesto que encerraba dentro de sí algunos de sus síntomas y de sus motivos más característicos (Perrone 1993, 137).

Los puntos de ruptura para una periodización alternativa de la historia de la iglesia se establecen de acuerdo con las distinciones orientadoras señaladas anteriormente. El primer período es el de la Antigüedad cristiana (siglos i al v). En el nivel del cristianismo organizado, señala la hegemonía y el posterior desplazamiento de Alejandría como el patriarcado con primacía en oriente, y culmina después de largas disputas dogmáticas contra gnósticos, arrianos, nestorianos y monofisitas[4] con el cisma de las iglesias cristianas orientales durante el Concilio de Calcedonia en 451.

El segundo período va del siglo vi al ix, hasta el IV Concilio de Constantinopla (869-879). Durante este tiempo se confirma la descalificación del monofisismo, así como todas las formas de compromiso con las iglesias orientales no calcedónicas. Hablando con propiedad, es el período en el que Constantinopla se consolida como la “nueva Roma”, y el inmediato siguiente a las invasiones masivas de pueblos “bárbaros” a Europa occidental y África del Norte.

Finalmente, el tercer y último período en que tiene lugar la Controversia de las Investiduras, del siglo x al siglo xvi. Este período es el inmediato posterior al cisma de Focio I y termina con el cisma de la iglesia latina que daría lugar a las iglesias evangélicas protestantes.

Muy al contrario de una interpretación para el período que enfatiza las tendencias cesaropapistas de los gobernantes seculares (desde Constantino una característica que siguió la costumbre y el uso aceptado), lo que realmente está sucediendo es una abrumadora centralización del poder en manos del patriarca romano. En este período, los patriarcas romanos alcanzan sus más altos poderes y también sus principales defectos: el lanzamiento de Cruzadas, la apropiación de las indulgencias, la creación de la Inquisición pontificia y el excesivo protocolo y opulencia en la celebración de la Eucaristía.

Además de los propios concilios papales, la concentración de poder en el patriarca romano se puede hacer notar en tres elementos distintivos: la curia romana (“ninguna administración secular se le podía comparar”), la figura del legado papal y la aparición de poderosas órdenes religiosas (Mitterauer 2010, 150-151). El poder translocal adquirido así transformaría al patriarcado romano en un poder proto-colonial aliado a los futuros poderes de Europa occidental:

Sin embargo, a fines del siglo xi, el papado, que durante al menos dos décadas había estado instando a los gobernantes seculares a liberar a Bizancio de los infieles, finalmente logró organizar la primera Cruzada (1096-1099). Una segunda Cruzada se lanzó en 1147 y una tercera en 1189. Estas primeras Cruzadas fueron las guerras extranjeras de la Revolución Papal [Reforma Gregoriana]. No solo aumentaron el poder y la autoridad del papado, sino que también abrieron un nuevo eje hacia el este al mundo exterior y convirtieron el Mar Mediterráneo de una barrera defensiva natural contra la invasión desde fuera en una ruta para la expansión militar y comercial de Europa occidental (Berman 1983, 100-101).

Martín Lutero y la diferenciación religiosa moderna

Calvino, León X y Lutero: Alegoría de la fe correcta (Allegorie auf dem rechten Glauben, 1650-1700) Museo Nacional Suizo.

La teoría de los sistemas sociales se refiere a las religiones estrictamente como comunicación. En una formulación llana, cuando la teoría habla de religión, el asunto trata “exclusivamente de comunicación religiosa, de sentido religioso que se actualiza en la comunicación como sentido de la comunicación”.[5] Pero esto ya implica un significado religioso específico diferente de otros significados en la sociedad:

Originariamente, la religión estaba asegurada por la sociedad misma. No en el sentido de que toda acción fuese siempre religiosamente calificada. Ni la comunicación social ni la naturaleza circundante estaban total y completamente sacralizadas. Pero en sus fundamentos, religión y sociedad no eran distinguibles… El acontecimiento histórico-evolutivo que queremos analizar bajo el título “proceso de diferenciación de la religión”, termina con esta posibilidad. El proceso de diferenciación envuelve una renuncia a la redundancia. La religión no asegura hoy ni contra la inflación ni contra un indeseado cambio de gobierno, ni contra el desenlace de una pasión, ni contra la refutación científica de las propias teorías. No puede inmiscuirse en otros sistemas de funciones (Luhmann 2009, 195).[6]

Antecedente teórico: La teoría de la diferenciación

La teoría de la diferenciación en sociología tiene una historia muy larga. Está presente no solo en Niklas Luhmann, sino también en importantes sociólogos clásicos y contemporáneos como Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Georg Simmel, Max Weber y Talcott Parsons: “Desde su establecimiento, la sociología se ha ocupado de la diferenciación” (Luhmann 2007a, 471ss).[7] El concepto se utiliza para producir la unidad de las diferencias o, si se quiere, para indicar la unidad a través de la pluralidad o la diversidad.

La diferenciación hace posible referirse a la realidad social de una manera más abstracta. Desde el siglo xix, las unidades y diferencias comenzaron a entenderse como resultado de procesos, es decir, como desarrollos evolutivos. En sociología, el concepto de diferenciación permitió cambiar las teorías del progreso con análisis estructurales. En gran medida, la antropología social misma compartiría esta idea evolutiva y estructural de las sociedades humanas.

¿Cómo han expresado tan diferentes autores la diferenciación a través de sus teorías? En Marx, la diferenciación se concibe como una teoría de las formaciones sociales, cada una con diferentes modos de producción. La diferenciación en Durkheim se entiende como división del trabajo social, característica de sociedades con solidaridad orgánica, opuesta a sociedades simples cuya solidaridad es mecánica.[8] La idea de la división del trabajo fue importada a la sociología desde la ciencia económica, junto con su valoración positiva.

La diferenciación en Simmel se expresa como una teoría de formas de asociación que se distinguen entre sí temporal y espacialmente. En Weber, la diferenciación se representa como diversidad institucional o como una multiplicidad de órdenes de vida (religión, economía, política, erótica). Estos órdenes de vida tenderán a ajustarse a una racionalidad con arreglo a fines.

La teoría del sistema general de acción de Talcott Parsons (esquema AGIL de cuatro funciones con sus variados fines constituyentes y medios) explica el desarrollo societal como una diferenciación creciente basada en diferencias de roles y esto, a su vez, proporciona la explicación del individualismo moderno.

Lo importante es enfatizar que el concepto de diferenciación tiene antecedentes muy amplios en sociología, antecedentes todos que la teoría de los sistemas sociales retoma y reconfigura. Luhmann terminará proponiendo tres tipos societales que, es importante señalar, coexisten en la sociedad mundial contemporánea y constituyen una tipología de la diferenciación social que admite varios grados de complejidad (la evaluación positiva de la mayor complejidad per se ahora queda eliminada).

Los tres tipos societales primordiales, de menor a mayor complejidad, son: a) sociedades segmentarias (de tipo tribal), compuestas por segmentos iguales; b) sociedades estratificadas (aristocráticas, de clase o de casta), compuestas por segmentos desiguales; y c) sociedad funcionalmente diferenciada (sociedad moderna), compuesta por diferentes sistemas sociales (religión, economía, política, derecho, ciencia). Esta visión de la sociedad moderna es considerada diferenciación societal externa, mientras que la diferenciación interna se expresa a través de varias confesiones de fe (en el sistema religioso), partidos políticos (en el sistema político) o teorías y métodos de investigación (en el sistema científico).

La diferenciación religiosa moderna

Es importante advertir que los sistemas sociales diferenciados de los que habla la teoría se refieren única y exclusivamente a comunicación, de modo que cuando se habla del sistema de la religión, la política o el deporte, la teoría se refiere solo a la comunicación religiosa, política o deportiva. Nos enfrentamos a una teoría sociológica de la comunicación que comprende en principio que la sociedad está compuesta únicamente por la comunicación.

Una vez que se han revisado los antecedentes básicos de la teoría de la diferenciación social, se puede presentar la tesis más importante de la teoría de los sistemas sociales relacionada con el sistema de religión: las reformas protestantes del siglo xvi no son más que la expresión de la diferenciación interna de la religión, que es concomitante con la aparición de un nuevo tipo societal: la sociedad funcionalmente diferenciada. Así, los protestantismos tienen que ver con el impulso evolutivo en el que las sociedades europeas pasaron de una forma de diferenciación estratificada a una moderna:

La Edad Media tardía y la Reforma añadieron una crítica al mérito y señalaron un desplazamiento radical hacia la gracia contra el énfasis general cristiano en los factores de salvación… Basado en algunas ideas muy controversiales, Weber asume que este desplazamiento creó motivos para la acción económica racional e incluso para la acción científica racional. Sin embargo, lo que es más importante es que el proceso desmanteló las interferencias de la religión en la economía y en la ciencia, que habían tomado la forma de evaluaciones relativamente concretas de la acción relevantes para la salvación… El éxito evolutivo probablemente descansa más en el fuerte desenredo y diferenciación de sistemas, que en la efectividad especial de una motivación ascética para el logro. Por lo tanto no es que se buscara un sustituto para la certidumbre religiosa de salvación en la esfera económica, sino más bien que esto ya no era posible hacerlo (Luhmann 2009, 168-169).

Si existe un legado de las reformas protestantes del siglo xvi para el mundo moderno, es que allanaron el camino hacia la especialización y la fragmentación de las comunicaciones religiosas.[9] Junto con la iglesia luterana, el cristianismo occidental fue, y sigue siendo, desmembrado en varias iglesias: calvinista, zwingliana, anabautista, anglicana, metodista, presbiteriana, etc. En este sentido, el protestantismo provocó que otros tipos de comunicaciones hicieran lo mismo: especializarse y fragmentarse (diversificarse). Por ejemplo, de la Dieta de Speyer en 1526 viene el principio cuius regio, eius religio (de acuerdo con la religión del rey, así será la del reino), con el cual cada príncipe protestante reclamó para sí mismo el derecho de adoptar una religión y organizar una iglesia propia de acuerdo con los dictados de su conciencia y, claramente, de acuerdo con las reformas religiosas en curso. De esta manera, la diferenciación religiosa reforzó la diferenciación política en Estados principescos al alimentar nociones incipientes de poder soberano.[10]

La diferenciación religiosa corrió en paralelo a la diferenciación de otras esferas de la vida y terminó en el siglo xviii con la constitución de un nuevo tipo de sociedad: la sociedad mundial moderna o contemporánea funcionalmente diferenciada. Esta sociedad se caracterizará por la diferenciación comunicacional (política, economía, derecho, religión, ciencia, arte, salud, deporte). O explicado de otra manera: para moverse y poder funcionar en la sociedad moderna, uno(a) debe distinguir esferas u órdenes de vida en lo comunicativo y situacional. Una persona habla y se comunica dependiendo de si está en casa, en la universidad, en la oficina, en el banco o en la iglesia de su predilección. De lo contrario, corre el riesgo de ser considerada “algo rara”.

A favor de esta interpretación de los protestantismos del siglo xvi —como diferenciación religiosa— habla la feliz confluencia de un estudio independiente cercano a la historia conceptual: antes del siglo xvi, el concepto de religión era indistinguible de muchas otras comunicaciones. No es hasta la llegada de los protestantismos que la religión adopta el significado moderno (diferenciado) de comunicaciones relacionadas exclusivamente con lo trascendental.[11]

References

  1. La ley canónica católica define la herejía como “la negación pertinaz, después de recibido el bautismo, de una verdad que ha de creerse con fe divina y católica, o la duda pertinaz sobre la misma; apostasía es el rechazo total de la fe cristiana; cisma, el rechazo de la sujeción al sumo Pontífice o de la comunión con los miembros de la Iglesia a él sometidos... [Sin embargo,] desde una perspectiva actual, los comentaristas de los textos paulinos, tanto católicos como protestantes, han optado por interpretar la expresión griega hairesis (latina haeresia) en el sentido de escisiones, partidos, facciones, no en el de discrepancias doctrinales que recibirían más adelante. San Pablo [1 Cor, 11: 19], vienen a decir, estaría pensando en los contrastes de caracteres prácticos, morales y personales de la comunidad de Corinto” (Mitre 2003, 175, 33).
  2. Para los mecanismos de la evolución sociocultural refiérase Luhmann (2007a, 325-469), en el tercer capítulo sobre evolución. El libro, considerado su mayor obra, fue publicado un año antes de su muerte (Luhmann 1997). La traducción española se publicó diez años después (Luhmann 2007a) y un borrador temprano fue publicado primero en italiano (Luhmann & De Giorgi 1992) y al año siguiente en español (Luhmann & De Giorgi 1993). La traducción inglesa salió a la luz bajo el sello de Stanford University Press en dos volúmenes (Luhmann 2012; 2013a).
  3. Para la argumentación en detalle refiérase Ornelas (2016, 35-65), capítulo segundo sobre herejías y organización cristiana.
  4. Contra la ortodoxia eclesiástica, los gnósticos postulaban una filosofía dualista que opone dos principios (bueno/ malo; luz/ oscuridad; espíritu/ materia), e incluye la creencia en un dios ignorante (demiurgo) que creó el mundo material malvado (Markschies 2002, 37-38) Los arrianos negaban la divinidad de Cristo. Los nestorianos rechazaban a María como madre de Dios. Los monofisitas argumentaban, sin negar la doble naturaleza de Cristo, que la naturaleza humana de Jesús había sido absorbida en favor de su divinidad.
  5. Compárese Luhmann (2007b, 37). Este libro se publicó póstumamente (Luhmann 2000). La traducción inglesa la publicó Stanford University Press (Luhmann 2013b).
  6. Este libro compila los dos artículos más importantes que Luhmann escribió en vida sobre el sistema de la religión (Luhmann 1977, 77-181; Luhmann 1989, 259-357). Una traducción inglesa de La dogmática religiosa puede encontrarse en Luhmann (1984).
  7. Frase con que inicia el capítulo cuatro sobre diferenciación.
  8. Para una revisión de las más importantes teorías sociológicas compárese Ritzer & Stepnisky (2011).
  9. Para la argumentación en detalle véase Ornelas (2016, 66-95), tercer capítulo sobre comunicaciones luteranas y contrarreforma.
  10. Los historiadores ahora aceptan la Controversia de las Investiduras de finales del siglo xi y principios del xii como el más claro antecedente del nacimiento del Estado moderno y, consecuentemente, como precondición de la diferenciación iglesia-Estado. Compárese Strayer (1970, 3-56), Berman (1983, 85-119) y Mitterauer (2010, 144-193).
  11. Para la argumentación en detalle revísese Nongbri (2013).

Bibliography

Alberigo, Giuseppe. 1993. Prólogo: Los concilios ecuménicos en la historia. In Historia de los concilios ecuménicos, Giuseppe Alberigo (ed.). Salamanca: Sígueme.

Berman, Harold. 1983. Law and Revolution. The Formation of the Legal Western Tradition. Cambridge/ London: Harvard University Press.

Jedin, Hubert. 1960. Breve historia de los concilios. Barcelona: Herder.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2013a. Theory of Society, Volume II. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2013b. A Systems Theory of Religion. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2012. Theory of Society, Volume I. Stanford: Stanford University Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2009. Sociología de la religión. México: Herder/ Universidad Iberoamericana (UIA).

Luhmann, Niklas. 2007a. La sociedad de la sociedad. México: Herder/ UIA.

Luhmann, Niklas. 2007b. La religión de la sociedad. Madrid: Trotta.

Luhmann, Niklas 2000. Die Religion der Gesellschaft. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1997. Die Gesellschaft der Gesellschaft. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1989. Die Ausdifferenzierung der Religion. In Gesellschaftsstruktur und Semantik. Studien zur Wissenssoziologie der modernen Gesellschaft, Vol. 3. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1984. Religious Dogmatics and the Evolution of Societies. New York/ Toronto: Edwin Mellen Press.

Luhmann, Niklas. 1977. Religiöse Dogmatik und Gesellschaftliche Evolution. In Funktion der Religion. Frankfurt: Suhrkamp.

Luhmann, Niklas & Raffaele De Giorgi. 1993. Teoría de la sociedad. México: UIA/ Universidad de Guadalajara.

Luhmann, Niklas & Raffaele De Giorgi. 1992. Teoria della società. Milano: Franco Angeli.

Markschies, Christoph. 2002. La gnosis. Barcelona: Herder.

Mitre F., Emilio. 2003. Ortodoxia y herejía: entre la Antigüedad y el Medievo. Madrid: Cátedra.

Mitre F., Emilio. 2000. Las herejías medievales de Oriente y Occidente. Madrid: Arco Libros.

Mitterauer, Michael. 2010. Why Europe? The Medieval Origins of Its Special Path. Chicago/ London: University of Chicago Press.

Nicol, D. M. 1997. Byzantine Political Thought. In The Cambridge History of Medieval Political Thought, c. 350-c.1450, James H. Burns (ed.). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

Nongbri, Brent. 2013. Before Religion. A History of a Modern Concept. New Haven/ London: Yale University Press.

Ornelas, Marco. 2018. Modern Religious Differentiation: The Latin Mass (1517-1570). Mexico: Independently Published.

Perrone, Lorenzo. 1993. El cuarto concilio de Constantinopla (869-870). In Historia de los concilios ecuménicos, Giuseppe Alberigo (ed.). Salamanca: Sígueme.

Ritzer, George & Jeffrey Stepnisky (eds.). 2011. The Wiley-Blackwell Companion to Major Social Theorists, Vols. I and II. Chichester: Wiley-Blackwell.

Strayer, Joseph R. 1970. On the Medieval Origins of the Modern State. New Jersey: Princeton University Press.


Article by Marco Ornelas.
Book designed by Benny Forsberg from the Noun Project - with lines.png

The text of this page has been reviewed and approved by the Lexicon of modernity (ISBN: 9788878393950 ; DOI: 10.5281/zenodo.1483194) editorial board.
Cite this page - Download PDF